Thursday, 6 July 2017


Sutera cordata 'Scopia Gulliver Blue' (sometimes known as Bacopa, or Chaenostoma cordatum), is a herbaceous annual with a trailing habit of growth, eventually spilling over the edges of hanging baskets and containers. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other garden plants with less refined foliage. This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It has no significant negative characteristics.

The plant grows to about 15 cm height and spreads over an area 50-60 cm in diameter. It is covered in stunning purple flowers with sky blue overtones and yellow eyes, along the stems from mid-spring to early winter. Its small serrated round leaves remain green in colour throughout the year. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Sutera cordata should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. It can be propagated by cuttings. It is a fine choice for the garden, but it is also a good selection for planting in outdoor containers and hanging baskets. Because of its trailing habit of growth, it is ideally suited for use as a 'spiller' in the 'spiller-thriller-filler' container combination; plant it near the edges where it can spill gracefully over the pot. Note that when growing plants in outdoor containers and baskets, they may require more frequent waterings than they would in the garden.

Although it's not a true annual, this fast-growing plant can be expected to behave as an annual if left outdoors over cold Winters, usually needing replacement the following year. As such, gardeners should take into consideration that it will perform differently than it would in its native habitat.

This post is part of the Floral Friday Fotos meme.

1 comment:

  1. I love Bacopa! Here in the South East of England I can usually get it through the winter to flower a second year. I use it in baskets and on the edges of my raised flower beds. The white variant is lovely treated almost like ground cover, and illuminates flower beds on summer evenings.